Learn

Learn

What is CBD?

Cannabidiol or CBD is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid compound with enormous therapeutic potential.

Cannabinoids are chemicals that trigger receptors in the brain and body. In addition to Phyto-cannabinoids produced by the plant, there are endogenous cannabinoids that occur naturally in the body.

CBD Has strong antioxidant anti-inflammatory anti-spasm anti-convulsant antipsychotic anti-tumorous strong antioxidant anti-inflammatory anti-spasm anti-convulsant antipsychotic anti-tumoral, and Nuro protective properties. CBD directly activates serotonin receptors, causing an antidepressant effect as well.

Scientific and clinical studies have shown that CBD Could be therapeutic for many conditions, including chronic pain, inflammation, cancer, anxiety, depression, diabetes, epilepsy, Rheumatoid arthritis, PTSD, sleep disorders, alcoholism, cardiovascular disease, antibiotic-resistant infections, and neurological ailments And many skin conditions including Acne, psoriasis, eczema, dermatitis.

Academic research centers in the United States and elsewhere are currently studying the effects of CBD on these and other health problems.

What is CBG?

Cannabigerol (CBG) is the first cannabinoid to form in a cannabis plant. It is also known as the parent cannabinoid, as all cannabinoids are formed from CBG. Unlike any other cannabinoid, CBG has an effect on both the CB1 and CB2 receptors. By enhancing CBD with CBG, a products potency, longevity, and onset are all significantly increased.

How is cannabidiol - CBD different
from Marijuana?

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). 

CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a “high.”

 According to a report from the World Health Organization, “In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.”

How Does CBD Work In The Body?

The Endocannabinoid System

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a complex cell-signaling system identified in the early 1990s by researchers exploring THC, a well-known cannabinoid

The ECS exists and is active in your body even if you don’t use cannabis.

The Endocannabinoid System (ECS) involves three core components:endocannabinoids, receptors, and enzymes.

Endocannabinoids

Endocannabinoids, also called endogenous cannabinoids, are molecules made by your body. They’re similar to cannabinoids, but they’re produced by your body.

Experts have identified two key endocannabinoids so far: 

  • anandamide (AEA)
  • 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG).

These help keep internal functions running smoothly. Your body produces them as needed, making it difficult to know what typical levels are for each.

Endocannabinoid receptors

These receptors are found throughout your body. Endocannabinoids bind to them in order to signal that the ECS needs to take action.

There are two main endocannabinoid receptors:

    • CB1 receptors, which are mostly found in the central nervous system
    • CB2 receptors, which are mostly found in your peripheral nervous system, especially immune cells

Endocannabinoids can bind to either receptor. The effects that result depend on where the receptor is located and which endocannabinoid it binds to.

For example, endocannabinoids might target CB1 receptors in a spinal nerve to relieve pain. Others might bind to a CB2 receptor in your immune cells to signal that your body’s experiencing inflammation, a common sign of autoimmune disorders.

Enzymes

Enzymes are responsible for breaking down endocannabinoids once they’ve carried out their function.

There are two main enzymes responsible for this:

  • fatty acid amide hydrolase, which breaks down AEA
  • monoacylglycerol acid lipase, which typically breaks down 2-AG

Enzymes are responsible for breaking down endocannabinoids once they’ve carried out their function.

There are two main enzymes responsible for this:

  • fatty acid amide hydrolase, which breaks down AEA
  • monoacylglycerol acid lipase, which typically breaks down 2-AG

What are the ECS functions?

The ECS is complicated, and experts haven’t yet determined exactly how it works or all of its potential functions.

Research has linked the ECS to the following processes:

  • appetite and digestion
  • metabolism
  • chronic pain
  • inflammation and other immune system responses
  • mood
  • learning and memory
  • motor control
  • sleep
  • cardiovascular system function
  • muscle formation
  • bone remodeling and growth
  • liver function
  • reproductive system function
  • stress
  • skin and nerve function

These functions all contribute to homeostasis, which refers to the stability of your internal environment. For example, if an outside force, such as pain from an injury or a fever, throws off your body’s homeostasis, your ECS kicks in to help your body return to its ideal operation.

Today, experts believe that maintaining homeostasis if the primary role of the ECS.

What is Homeostasis?

Homeostasis is a biological balance in your body’s natural rhythms. Sometimes it’s described as equilibrium in your system. Homeostasis has a big impact on your overall well-being. New research is always emerging exploring the link between homeostasis, and physical, mental, and even emotional health. People take CBD because they want to support their ECS, and all the work it does.

What about endocannabinoid deficiency?

Some experts believe in a theory known as clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD). This theory suggests that low endocannabinoid levels in your body or ECS dysfunction can contribute to the development of certain conditions. A 2016 article reviewing over 10 years of research on the subject suggests the theory could explain why some people develop migraine, fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome. None of these conditions have a clear underlying cause. They’re also often resistant to treatment and sometimes occur alongside each other. If CECD does play any kind of role in these conditions, targeting the ECS or endocannabinoid production could be the missing key to treatment.

How does CBD interact with the ECS?